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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
the continent of north america malcolm included quote, if america continues increasing, chad which she will certainly do, the indian will be driven further and further back into the country until the whole races ultimately exterminated. how could the united states claim to be the quote strongest defender freedom when it denied the basic rights of survival to native americans for tax malcolm declared quote the right of exterminating or trying to -- where they must starve even the inhabitants of thinly peopled regions would be questioned and immoral the. all of us have good reason to be alarmed at the u.s. population rate since the nation's number have been increasing at such an remarkable pace. with no european rival to contend with, nothing stood in the way at the doubling of u.s. lands in every doubling of the u.s. population except for thousands of indians who continued to live on their native ground. the united states thus provided a perfect object lesson for claims that x. is population fueled territorial aggression. in what i need your any euro american size of virtuous cycle that
-old son malcolm in the arms of his wife gloria. >> and here's sharon cobb, pediatric nurse practitioner with a syringe in malcolm's mouth. nor ar gloria is standing there, just tears extremie inine ining -- s down her face, agony written all over her face. >> these syringes found later were filled with cyanide to kill the children. >> all they're doing is taking a drink to go to sleep. that's what death is, sleep. >> malcolm was dead. his little lips covered with foam, which is what happens with arsenic and cyanide is it foams at the mouth. i put my arms around gloria as she was holding malcolm and just kept on sobbing, i love you so much, i love you so much. i held gloria until she died. >> the vat, the vat. where's the vat with the green -- bring it here so the adults can begin. >> jones' last self-serving words as the tape ends. >> we didn't commit suicide. we committed an act of revolutionary suicide protesting the conditions of an inhumane world. >> jim jones did not drink the cyanide. when almost everyone else was dead, jones was shot in the head. probably by a trusted aide. befor
on the board of directors and christine, the newest member. and the other members and malcolm couldn't be here today but we are proud to work together on behalf of the people of the city and we are happy to have john fung head this up and behalf of the board and all of us and thank you mr. secretary. mr. administrator. senator feinstein, leader pelosi, congress woman spear and mayor lee and thank you all for being here and now it's time to make it official. it's sign that document. okay. [applause] >> thank you tom. and as we're getting ready to sign this grand slam document let me make sure we give a great appreciation to our county transportation authority who has been administering the funds for this great project and a great shout out to the union square improvement district. i know there are businesses big and small that will suffer a little bit from the construction but they're going to be patient. they know the result of this is a great future for our great city and thank you to all of the businesses and we will be communicating with them all the time with all of the agencies. deca
look at what happens early in the year malcolm x is assassinated. and then of course what we haven't mentioned yet is how you interpret the event. so here these big developments that are taking place, and in your mind you think it is the most equal weight if you will to the unfolding of the 60's with what is going on in the civil rights and the way that you almost set this up almost a consensus historian tape on the civil rights movement. if i were a southern white i would say that the eve of the destruction was either 54, 57 or 64. it certainly wasn't when it comes to civil rights 55. so there is a worry that that maybe their perspective. let's talk about that for the second. as a kind of a criticism people assume that we are all on board with civil rights and 64 or at least it can be managed. >> i say 64 as i mentioned before as a year of enormous strides and civil rights movement, and i wrote a book on brown v. board we mentioned in 1954. as you know, as everybody knows this was supposed to bring about an end to racial segregation in the public schools. in 1964 no black kids are
malcolm x was assassinated. then of course we have been mentioned yet is you have the watts riot on how you interpret the event. the tears the development taking place. you get the most equal weight to the unfolding in the way you almost set this up is that you almost as an history take the civil rights if our southern night i would say that either destruction with either faith before, 57 or 64 if you will. it certainly was when it comes to civil rights 65. so that maybe their perspective, but let's just talk about that for a second. it's kind of a criticism, you almost assume we are all in toward the civil rights in 64, or at least it can be managed. >> guest: yes, i see 64, as i mentioned before as the year of enormous strides in the civil rights movement. i wrote a book on the brown deep lord case in 1964. as you know and everybody knows, this was supposed to bring an end to racial segregation in public schools. in 1864, virtually no black kids were going to score twice in the deep south. so in 10 years, the supreme court -- unanimous supreme court decision had virtually no effect. w
crisis clinic. she also previously worked at malcolm state hospital. through the years kelly has become the expert within sfpd in terms of police interactions with mentally ill and we've had a long, a history of trying as a city and as a department to grapple with the issue of how do we respond appropriately to subjects who are mentally ill and may not really be in a right state of mind and making sure we use alternatives other than deadly force. kelly has really been instrumental in sort of moving that training program forward and making sure all of our officers know how to respond. kelly, you've been just an amazing public servant in san francisco, and i'm thrilled to have appointed you to the mental health board and honor you today. congratulations. (applause) >>> thank you, supervisor wiener. i just want to thank you for honoring me and thank you, all the board of supervisors. i really appreciate this because we all have been coming together for mental health in the community, trying to revirginiavv l our latest training and have [speaker not understood] where things have to go to t
terms to recall all that was said in a phone call from a loved one- half a world away. malcolm shall told his brother that he was beaten for trying to escape. the parents of marine start sergeant jimmy lopez says he was forced to sleep in a closet and abused. but the mental torture apparently was much worse and far more common than the physical abuse. the militants tried to break marine sergeant mcheal by telling him his mother was dead and he could go to the funeral only if he would cooperate. he did not find out that she was alive until he talked to her this morning. >> my brother was told that our mother was dead. and he had a tooth knock out. >> how? >> he just said one of the guard knocked a tooth out. he didn't say when. >> roberts who was released during the first month of the crisis described the scene. where the militants played russian roulette with two militant secretaries that refused to speak. and a midnight raid by arm hooded iranians that clicked the bolt of their rivals as if preparing to fire. rogers was shown letters in his mother's handwriting but was not allowed t
in the base -- down stairs in the bisment. >> nick is in serious condition. levi malcolm has been released. >>> now baltimore county police arrested a man for a robbery but now they believe he's responsible for at least two sexual assaults. police said 19-year-old jordan ?ied are has been charged. detectives say he rob ladno car0 >>> the driver could still lose her job. she's been suspended without pay as the mta reviews the case internally. >> a chill in the air. look at the temperatures now dropping. 3345 in towson. 36 in wrest minister. 3 in rock hall. under a generally clear sky. falling temperatures overnight, below freezing by daybreak tomorrow. satellite radar perspective. we're in a clear patch but a little bet of mid-level, high level cloud cover coming in. no precipitation but it will keep temperatures up. the rest of the evening we're in the 40s. by daybreak tomorrow temperatures will be very cold. frost by 6 a.m. we'll talks about the changes on the way by friday. maryland's most accurate forecast coming up. >> now pan update to the breaking news we brought you on good morning
, get your hands up. on "malcolm x" with warner, a lot more money on the line, he still managed to make exactly the movie he wanted. (john pierson) but he's had to put up with a lot more resistance. he's had to fight more fights. you can't gamble in harlem without the white man's okay. (narrator) lee's ambitious "malcolm x" cost or $25 million. (malcolm "x") i say and i say it again, you been had, you been joked. you been hoodwinked, bamboozled and led astray, run amok. there was a point in the film, after we had finished shooting, while we were finishing, where the money was cut off. i wanted to continue working, so i called up michael jordan and magic johnson, prince, janet jackson, tracy chapman, oprah winfrey, and i just told them the truth: i need money. and they wrote me a check -- all of them. (narrator) 1994 signaled a return to smaller budgets with "crooklyn" a film about growing up in brooklyn in the 1970's. what we wanted to do is to elevate black cinema to what we've done in music, in sports and everything else. we're not at the level yet because we're in our infancy as far
that will probably be a couple of examples. >> malcolm o'hagan, it's october 2012 and we're taking this interview. where are you in the process right now? >> we have just about all of the sort of foundation documents in the space with the businessman, the concept men. back into the we will be analysis completed by the end of the we will have the fundraising strategy in place, and we will be ready to move forward with the next phase, which, of course, is the fundraising. starting to develop the exhibit ideas in more concrete terms. i should've mentioned that actually out our website we have our first exhibit and would very much encourage her viewers to go the. it was inspired at the fact that we are world leaders at the united states this spring and without of be very interesting to look at what the american writing influence has been some surprises. there are basically three parts to the exhibit. so that is one, looking at what is influence the foreign leaders. we have leading authors that we asked them what american works they would recommend to a very -- american theaters to help them better un
at what happens early in the year. malcolm x assassinated. then selma, ask then, of course, what we have not mentioned yet is in august you have the watts riot. and so here these big developments are taking place, and in your mind, you seem to give a most equal weight, if you will to the unfolding of the '60s with what's going on in civil rights, and the way you almost set this up, though -- i wonder about this -- you almost through a consensus historian take on the civil rights movement. if i were a southern white, i would say that the eve of destruction was eve of '54, '57, or '64. if you will. >> guest: okay. it. >> host: it was when it comes to civil rights, 1965. that may be their perspective. let's talk about that for a second. as kind of a criticism, you almost assume we're all on board with civil rights in '64, or at least it could be managed. at least that much you seem to be saying. >> guest: yes. i'd say '64, is a mentioned before, as a year of enormous strides in the civil rights movement. i wrote a book on brown vs. board case, you mentioned 1954. and as you know, and everyb
seawalls, levees, or huge surge barriers. one professor, malcolm bowman. >> if we had such things in place, there would have been no damage at all. >> reporter: others don't see that happening. >> i don't think there is a practical way to build barriers in the ocean. when you have an enormous harbor like we do. >> reporter: the questions and the cleanup continue. >> the perspective you get from up here is that this is going to take weeks, maybe months. >> this is not over yet by a long shot. >> reporter: richard engel, nbc news, new york. >>> and we'll have more of richard's reporting and ann curry's reporting on "rock center," an hour devoted to the recovery of this storm. >>> we'll take a break, when we come back, the army volunteers making a difference when lives are on the line. >>> we have, just in, the first new satellite images showing how hard parts of the jersey shore got hit. normandy beach, where houses are simply erased. this was a perfect beach front peninsula, to having a new inlet from the ocean to the bay. the homes that were there along that stretch of beach, now largely g
zi io, connects with malcolm kennedy for the 24-yard td. am thinking upset. ensuing 'bama possession, a.j. mccarron hooks up with amare cooper. cooper trots across the goal line. 'bama down five with six minutes to play. last chance for the crimson tide. fourth and goal. not going to happen. mccarron is picked off in the end zone. aggies hang on to upset the number one team in the country. 29-24. okay. meanwhile the lakers may have handled business against the warriors friday night but the organization is still in flux after firing head coach mike brown yesterday following a 1-4 start to the season. but a familiar face is emerging as a top candidate to replace mike brown for the job. according to multiple reports, former lakers head coach and 11-time nba champion phil jackson has been offered the job as the next head coach for the team. 67-year-old who retired after the 2011 season met with team vice president jim buss this morning for preliminary talks. >>> that would be very interesting. that will do it for now. back in the next hour with more from the x finity sportsdesk. >> thank
manziel to malcolm kennedy. 29-17 aggies the number one in trouble. but alabama makes their comeback. aj mccarron down the sidelines to cooper. touchdown 'bama. they pull within five. less than two minutes to go. alabama knocking on the doorstep. but mccarron's fourth down pass is intercepted by everett. huge mistake from mcquarrion mccarron and the aggies take over. but tyler hayes jumps offside. the penalty gives texas a&m a first down and the ball game. nick saban and alabama fall 29- 24. >>> stanford still controls its own destiny to get to the rose bowl. they'll need to beat oregon, ucla and win the pac 12 title game. red shirt freshman kevin hogan at the quarterback for the cardinal. the first quarter all stanford. taylor from the one yard line and 7-0 cardinal. still first quarter off the play fake. hogan rolls out and hits ryan hewitt. hewitt takes it in. stanford with an early 14-0 lead. but the beavers would score 23 unanswered points and they were rolling. vase to marcus wheatton for the touchdown. oregon state by nine. final play of the third quarter, hogan, under pressure. f
who tkufrpgs across for 7- 0. the top pass, later in the 3rd. brandon meyers, kicked off by malcolm. he is going to tight rope the sidelines, 55 yards for a score, 14-0 for the saints. they were not all his fault. watch the second and meyers, should be a touchdown. going in his hands, could be a safety. these are the mistakes that will lose 3 games in a row. they would a tone, however. he does a great job keeping the play alive. he fires this, threads the needle to meyers. the raiders cut the saints to the lead, we have a football game. but, want a momentum killer? here you go. down, 13, breeze, wide open moore. he found the end zone twice. i can not figure out how he got that wide open on 3rd down and 13th play. down, after 75 yard kick off return. mark picks up a huge block and he is gone. 27 yards, saints win 38-17. oakland now out one 135 points in the last three games. >> it is disappointing the guys put their heart and soul into it and did not get the results. and, and that is the challenge that we face. and we got -- it is going to turn. and it is going to turn for the posit
for an inner city school that could use her energy and new ideas. now comes word that malcolm x elementary is one of 20 schools the chancellor wants to close. >> it is breaking my heart that i came here to students who are in need and they are being forgotten and left behind. i'm feeling that dcps is pulling the rug out from underneath me after 11 weeks of school. >> reporter: it is decision time for dozens of people would packed the city council public hearing on the school closure plan. it affects 3,000 students in six wards. most of the schools on the plus are east of the river or in northeast. -- on the list are east of the river or in northeast. she came with her dad to hear why her school has to close. the family moved here from dallas and it is the only school she has ever known. >> we won't have a school that we withhold hands and walk down the street to. i think that is problematic. they are closing down the community. >> reporter: that is how aaron martin feels about the proposal to close francis stevens education campus and send those students to marie reed elementary, a move th
first. >> tim carter saw his 1-year-old son poisoned. >> malcolm was dead, his little lips covered with foam. this is what happens with arsenic and cyanide as it foams at the mouth. >> he held his wife as she died. >> i put my arms around gloria as she was holding malcolm and just kept on sobbing, i love you so much, i love you so much. >> carter lived only because he was sent away on a final errand. he came close to shooting himself that night. >> and i knew that i would never get the sounds and the smells and the sights of jonestown out of my mind ever again. >> so few survived jonestown. for most, only by determination borne of desperation. for others, by a twist of circumstance. over the next two hours we will follow the lives of these survivors, then and now. "escape from jonestown" continues. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. soothes you to sleep with ingredients like melatonin. it's safe with no side effects, so you wake
for as long as five hours. >> , on and get in line. m.l. come back wilson began -- malcolm wilson this 16 years ago. >> i wanted to make sure that our community got something so there was one less thing to stressor about during this holiday season. >> the charity that keep out over 1200 turkeys is as>> we've raise the money, and by the birds and give them out we do not want to see i did a vacation or where you live, residency or ask you what your status is if you are in line, you are going to get a turkey. >> but it is also about fostering a sense of community service for the next generation. >> it is not the grown ups it is the children passing them out we want them to have the opportunity to give out a turkey and see what it is to give back the committee that is the bottom line for us. in oakland, jeff pierce, kron 4 news. >> the owners of a controversial slaughterhouse are not settling a lawsuit out of a suit accusing cattle. the company will pay $300,000 to and that suits the also agreed to a $497 million judgment against this meatpacking industry. it will not be collected because the
of the students to the war. 65 is a way in which you look at what happens early in the year malcolm x was assassinated in you wrote the film and in the course what we haven't mentioned yet is in august you have the right depending on how you interpret the event so here are these big developments that are taking place in my mind you seem to give an equal weight if you will to the unfolding of the 60's with what is going on in the civil rights, and the way that you almost set this up, you almost droll the consensus take on the movement. if i were a southern white, i would say the eve of the destruction was either 54, 57 or 64 if you will. but it suddenly wasn't when it comes to civil rights so that maybe their perspective. let's just talk about that for the second? as a kind of criticism you can almost assume that we are on board with civil rights and 64 to be managed that much. >> host: rac 64 as i mentioned before as a year of enormous strides in the civil rights movement and here i wrote a book on brown v. board case you mentioned in 1954. and as you know, as a free latinos, this was
. malcolm in florida. malcocol malcolm? >> caller: jim, thank you for that heads on amgen and starbucks last week. those were great calls. >> thank you. i like them both. starbucks, this tivana is going to be so huge for them. people keep misjudging howard shultz. one day they'll say that shultz was okay. what's up? >> caller: well, jim, i'm going a retired guy with 50% of the portfolio invested in high yield municipal bond etfs. my question to you is, in this environment, with the economic environment, with the possibility of a compromise regarding the fiscal cliff, vis-a-vis the increase revenues and cuts in spending, what is your analysis and your opinion on the tax free municipal bonds at this juncture? >> you have to buy them. the individual is going to go right back them and move them up. i think that's a great place to be. don't touch them. i want you to buy them. brilliant idea. now we go to paul in louisiana. paul? >> caller: hey, jim. thanks for taking my call. >> no problem. >> caller: i've been just getting in and sticking with a stock itw. i've been following it for a couple mon
. i wanted them to know and the american people to know that story. >> who is malcolm karen and what happened to him? >> he was a professor of political science at ucla who the before i arrived for my ph.d. had grown up in beirut, his parents had been on the faculty and though he had made a very distinguished career for himself in the united states as a scholar he went home in the early 80s to lead the school during a period of particularly difficult times when they route had fractured due to the civil war and the israeli incursion of 1962. the city was a mess, the school was under assault, there was a lot of danger but he believed going back and running the school and providing good leadership in a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that he loved and he gave his life for the school. he was assassinated in january of 1984. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah. group known as islamic jihad that comprised lebanese shia and historically underprivilege, excluded from the politics and economics of the country and ideological affinity
. >> malcolm was dead. his little lips covered with foam. this is what happens with arsenic and cyanide as it foams at the mouth. >> he held his wife as she died. >> i put my arms around gloria as she was holding malcolm and just kept on sobbing i love you so much. i love you so much. >> carter lived only because he was sent away on a final errand. he came close to shooting himself that night. >> and i knew that i would never get the sounds and the smells and the sights of jonestown out of my mind ever again. >> so few survived jonestown. for most only by determination borne of desperation. for others by a twist of circumstance. over the next two hours we will follow the lives of these survivors, then and now. "escape from jonestown" continues. miles card from capital one, thor's couture gets the most rewards of any small business credit card. your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics, put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve the mos
. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the american writers museum? >> the american writers museum may be a future home for book tv studio is among other things. but seriously, it can be a place where people will come and engage with writers and writing in ways that they have never been able to do before. it will be the first national museum dedicated to celebrating our writers and helping people understand the impact it's had on our culture and our history and our daily life. >> we spoke to you about two years ago when the concept was just getting off the ground. what is the progress that you have made in the last two years? >> first let me thank you for having me back on. i very much appreciate that and have welcomed the opportunity to bring people up to date on the project. we have made a lot of progress. and i judge that not by what we say but by what others say. they are very impressed. we have -- starting off we have pretty much established beyond a doubt that this is a very wort
and tested over time. they could be models for new york, says malcolm bowman an oceanographer who studies storm surge barriers at stonybrook university. >> the barriers would only be closed for perhaps three or four hours at a time when a major storm hits the city and the tides are rising and the surge is sitting on top of a high tide. that's the dangerous time. >> reporter: bowman called together several engineering firms in 2009 to develop sea wall designs for various points around new york. these are not yet official proposals, merely concepts. a 6.5 billion dollar idea for a barrier just north of the bridge with sliding doors that would be closed during a storm. a 1.5 billion dollar 1700-foot long system of mechanical swing gates on the arthur's hill river and the most ambitious plan is also the one that could protect the most shoreline. a $6 billion gateway that would stretch five miles across the outer new york/new jersey harbor plus the billions necessary to reinforce nearly ten miles of natural dunes on either side of the barrier. while the cost of mitigating the impact of a futur
professor malcolm bowman. >> if we had such barriers in place during hurricane sandy, there would have been no damage at all. >> reporter: others, including mayor michael bloomberg, don't see that happening. >> i don't know that i think there's any practical ways to build barriers in the oceans. that's not -- when you have an enormous harbor like we do. >> reporter: the question and the cleanup continues. the protection you get from up here is this is going to take weeks, maybe months. >> it's not over yet by a long shot. >> richard engel reporting from new york city. the pumps being used to clear the city's tunnels can remove up to 16,000 gallons a minute. that's a lot but still a daunting task. in one tunnel alone tlr, there remains some 80,000 gallons of standing water. i want to show you some pictures we're just getting in ridgefield, new jersey. this is a sonoco station in ridgefield. the scarcity of gas, the lack of power at a lot of these stations has caused lines for miles and miles and miles. when you see it from high above, it's amazing that people are even able to wait this long.
to the city. i would like to invite him and meet him on corner of 125th and malcolm x boulevard and have a lovely peaceful time. join me, won't you? >> there are people on the left and on the right that are talking about like an ending after this election, this is what happens. child doesn't get his first birthday. people get very emotional and life goes on. >> exactly. there will be hard feelings, but there won't be kind of like l.a. riot type violence. >> if only there was a guy, the kind of outrage that erupts when you get upset somebody named greg gutfeld. >> what does ignite do? >> he runs a talk show. >> you wouldn't be german, would you? >> no, i'm dutch. i've made a few in my time. i have a video of your animal doing something strange. go to foxnews.com/"redeye". and vevy is coming up. >> we're sponsored by elvis. american cultural icon often to be considered the most influential musician of the 20th century. >> greg: we're back, if we got anything wrong so far, let's go to andy levy. >> good news. >> greg: what are you talking about. >> a buff. >> i don't know. he is canadian. >
political analyst juan williams the author of backlash. there was switchy michelle malcolm catches all of the tweets. if my candidate doesn't win i am going to riot. i don't like the stereo typical comments. don't you find that offense i have? >> it is outrageous what is going on. the left is getting desperate. where is the black liberal establishment with this chatter we are hearing on twitter about inciting race violence if romney wins and obama loses. did you see all of those? >> they are horrible. >> there are people who will say anything on twitter, on the internet. i could show you my mail bag. it is pretty horrible. i am telling you guys. if you think it's a sign of desperation on the left, i think the right is getting desperate. colin powell just endorses obama baez he's another black guy? >> the bottom line is the left can do what they say whenever they want with the horrible comments. with the james lowrie he's a bitter old man who made racist and hateful comments. >> i got to know him. he marched with martin luther king. he was there with may yard ja--d jackson. we have alwa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)